LIBOR grant funds pioneering new Babypod Trolley and Equipment

Thanks to money raised by you, together with funds from the Chancellor using LIBOR funds, we have been able to provide a brand new, pioneering Babypod trolley configured especially for transferring twins and accompanying equipment for the Neonatal Emergency Stabilisation and Transport (NEST) team. Responsible for transferring the most at-risk babies to and from St Michael’s Hospital from hospitals across the South West and South Wales, NEST carefully transport these very poorly babies while providing critical care and expertise using some of the latest lifesaving medical equipment funded by Cots for Tots.

Back in July 2017, new parents Simon and Stacey from Yeovil were the first to benefit from this new equipment after the birth of their three girls, Ava, Lacey and Blakely.

“It wasn’t possible for our beautiful triplets to be born at our local hospital, so the plan was to transfer them back after the birth, but this was dependent on so many factors. Our local hospital needed three free cots, and the move was also dependent on the NEST team’s availability; understandably any emergencies took priority, which pushed back the move several times. 

“Six days after the girls were born, we got the news they were moving Ava, whilst Lacey and Blakely were due to move the following morning. We really wanted the girls to be moved together so they wouldn’t be separated for long which would be traumatic, and supplying milk to two different hospitals would be very stressful.

“An emergency early the next morning meant we had to wait two nights before the NEST team was able to take Lacey and Blakely back to be reunited with Ava. The new Babypod took so much stress away from us, knowing that only one more trip was required. Seeing them all back together again was indescribable! We will always be grateful to the amazing NEST team for getting our girls safely back to our local hospital in as few trips as possible. Thank you so much.”

The Babypod has since enabled NEST to move 25 more babies from the surrounding region including Poole, Exeter and Cardiff.  In the past transporting twins has often presented challenges for neonatal transport teams; including cot space and ensuring the availability of the team to transfer both babies. Having one team available at any time can mean that the second transfer might not be achievable within one shift, or that a more clinically urgent referral takes priority. These challenges are often the source of a huge amount of anxiety for parents, as having two babies separated in different cities is practically difficult, and extremely stressful.